ISAKOS: 2019 Congress in Cancun, Mexico
ISAKOS

2019 ISAKOS Biennial Congress ePoster #702

 

Patellar Tendinopathy Increases the Risk of BTB Autograft Failure After ACL Reconstruction

Eduard Alentorn-Geli, MD, PhD, MSc, FEBOT, FACGME, Barcelona SPAIN
Dhaval Gotecha, MBBS, MS(Orth), Mumbai INDIA
Gilbert Steinbacher, MD, Sant Just Desvern SPAIN
Pedro Alvarez-Diaz, MD, PhD, Prof., Barcelona SPAIN
David Barastegui, MD, Barcelona SPAIN
Roberto Seijas-Vazquez, MD, PhD, Prof., Barcelona SPAIN
Xavier Cuscó, MD, Barcelona SPAIN
Kristian Samuelsson, MD, PhD, MSc, Prof., Mölndal SWEDEN
Alex L. Lazarides, MD, Durham, NC UNITED STATES
Ramon Cugat, MD, PhD, Barcelona SPAIN

Mutualidad Catalana de Futbolistas, Barcelona, SPAIN

FDA Status Not Applicable

Summary

The presence of patellar tendinopathy increases the risk of BTB graft failure when used for ACL reconstruction. The use of BPTB autograft is not recommended if patellar tendinopathy is obvious or there are suspicious of partial tendon tear on MRI. In such cases, the surgeon should consider using a different graft.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of patellar tendinopathy on primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction graft failure when using bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft.

Methods

All patients undergoing primary ACL reconstruction using ipsilateral BPTB with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) available for review were approached for eligibility. The medical charts of included patients were reviewed to obtain demographic information, anatomical characteristics, injury characteristics, treatment characteristics, length of follow-up, and presence of graft failure. A single, fellowship-trained, knee-specialist and blinded researcher performed preoperative MRI interpretation of patellar tendinopathy. The presence/absence of patellar tendinopathy (none, mild, moderate, or severe changes) was compared between patients with (cases) and without (controls) failure of ACL reconstruction. There were 559 cases with a median (range) clinical follow-up was 8 (4-30) months and an average age of 21.5 years (82% males).

Results

Of the 559 cases, there were 182 (32.6%) with and 377 (67.4%) without patellar tendinopathy. A total of 32 (5.7%) graft failures occurred. There were a significantly higher failure rate in patients with compared to without patellar tendinopathy (p<0.001), and in patients with compared to without partial tendon tear (p<0.001). The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for graft failure was 5.9 (2.7-13.1), 20.8 (6.8-63.9) and 54.4 (5.5-539.4) in patients with patellar tendinopathy (compared to absence of patellar tendinopathy), moderate or severe patellar tendinopathy (compared to none or mild patellar tendinopathy), or partial tendon tear (compared to absence of tendon tear), respectively.

Conclusion

The presence of patellar tendinopathy increases the risk of BPTB graft failure when used for ACL reconstruction. The use of BPTB autograft is not recommended if patellar tendinopathy is obvious or there are suspicious of partial tendon tear on MRI. In such cases, the surgeon should consider using a different graft.