Search Filters

  • Presentation Format
  • Media Type
  • Diagnosis / Condition
  • Diagnosis Method
  • Patient Populations
  • Treatment / Technique

Does The Position During Postoperative Physiotherapy Affect Outcome Of Arthroscopic Treatment Of Acromioclavicular Dislocation; A Prospective Comparative Study

2021 Congress Paper Abstracts

Does The Position During Postoperative Physiotherapy Affect Outcome Of Arthroscopic Treatment Of Acromioclavicular Dislocation; A Prospective Comparative Study

Tarek M. T. Ghandour, MD, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

ain shams university, cairo, EGYPT


2021 Congress   ePoster Presentation     Not yet rated

 

Anatomic Location

Diagnosis / Condition

Patient Populations

Diagnosis Method

This media is available to ISAKOS 2021: Global Registrants and On Demand purchases only.
Please log in or purchase to access.


Summary: the patient’s posture during early postoperative rehabilitation did not affect the outcome regarding pain, function or the changes in the coracoclavicular distance


Purpose

Coracoclavicular(CC) distance rewidening is commonly reported finding after arthroscopic treatment of Acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation. We aim to compare the effect of the patient’s posture (erect or supine) during the rehabilitation sessions on the pain, function and the CC distance.

Methods

60 patients with acute AC dislocation injury type III and IV were randomly allocated in two groups according to their posture during the rehabilitation phase (Supine Rehabilitation Group or Erect Rehabilitation Group), arthroscopic stabilization with TightRope was used for all the patients. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Constant-Murley Score (CMS), and coracoclavicular (CC) distance were assessed preoperatively and after 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years postoperatively.

Results

no significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of the VAS, CMS scores, and CC distance changes. A significant improvement over the follow-up phase in the VAS and CMS of both groups. The CC distance in both groups was significantly reduced from the preoperative (29.34 mm in the ERG and 28.65 mm in the SRG) to the first postoperative day (10.44 mm in the ERG and 10.11 mm in the SRG). However, a statistically significant rewidening in the CC distance after 6 months (13.55 mm for the ERG and 13.50 mm for the SRG) and 12 months (15.51 for the ERG and 15.80 for the SRG, P<0.001).

Conclusion

The patient’s posture during early postoperative rehabilitation did not affect the outcome regarding pain, function or the changes in the coracoclavicular distance.
Level of Evidence: I


More ISAKOS 2021: Global Content