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The Early And Encouraging Results Of Suture Tape For Glenoid Labral Repair In Shoulder Stabilisation

2021 Congress Paper Abstracts

The Early And Encouraging Results Of Suture Tape For Glenoid Labral Repair In Shoulder Stabilisation

John Ranson, MBChB, BSc (Hons), MRCSEd, UNITED KINGDOM Lee Hoggett, MBChB, MRCS, UNITED KINGDOM Neil Jain, BM, MRCS(Ed), FRCS(Tr&Orth), UNITED KINGDOM

Northern Care Alliance, Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM


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Summary: We believe this study demonstrates that suture tape is potentially superior to traditional suture in arthroscopic labral repair surgery.


Introduction

Arthroscopic shoulder stabilisation is an established treatment for recurrent instability. Recent advances have led to the introduction of tape rather than suture with the intent that a broader and flatter material would provide a more stable repair of the glenoid labrum with less suture prominence. Ultimately the hope is that this would translate to a better clinical outcome.

Aim

To report the clinical findings from a series of patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder stabilisation using tape rather than suture.

Method

A retrospective series of 57 patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder stabilisation were reviewed. Each underwent arthroscopic shoulder stabilisation in the form of labral (Bankart) repair using knotless anchor fixation and suture tape. 4 patients were excluded due to repair in the preceding 6 months. 35 patients (66%) completed Oxford Shoulder Instability Scores.

Results

The mean age at surgery was 31 (16-61) years. There were 46 males and 11 females. Follow up was a mean of 33 months (6-60). There were no surgical complications in the group, 5 patients (9%) suffered a further dislocation post stabilisation. Mean time between stabilisation and first dislocation post operatively was 23 months. The mean Oxford Shoulder Instability Score was 41.1 (39.0-43.4 95% CI). A score of between 40-48 is deemed an excellent outcome.

Conclusion

The established literature suggests a re-dislocation rate of 25-33% following arthroscopic shoulder stabilisation surgery. Our cohort of early results represents a lower rate with excellent patient-reported outcomes and no reported surgical complications. We conclude this may be due to the use of tape rather than suture in labral repair.

IMPLICATIONS
We feel that the excellent patient-reported outcomes and low dislocation rate in this series demonstrates that suture tape is potentially superior to traditional suture. Further research should be undertaken as a randomised trial.


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