2017 ISAKOS Biennial Congress ePoster #138

 

Modified Broström Procedure for Chronic Lateral Ankle Instability in Patients with Generalized Joint Laxity

Gun-Woo Lee, MD, Gwangju, Jeonnam KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Chonnam National University Medical School and Hospital, Gwangju, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF

FDA Status Not Applicable

Summary

Generalized joint laxity appears to be a risk factor associated with recurrent instability after the modified Brostro¨m procedure for chronic lateral ankle instability.

Abstract

Background

Generalized joint laxity (GJL) has been considered a risk factor for late failure of ligament reconstruction in the knee; however, it is not known whether GJL is the cause of recurrent instability after the modified Brostro¨m procedure for chronic lateral ankle instability.

Purpose

To compare the clinical results of the modified Brostro¨m procedure for chronic lateral ankle instability in patients with or without GJL.

Methods

A total of 100 patients (100 ankles) who underwent the modified Brostro¨m procedure were divided into 2 groups, with or without GJL, according to the Beighton criteria. Age and body mass index were matched between the 2 groups. The mean follow-up duration was 43.3 months in the laxity group (44 ankles; Beighton score 5) and 42.9 months in the nonlaxity group (56 ankles).

Results

The mean preoperative Karlsson and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores were a respective 53.2 and 60.9 in the laxity group and 53.9 and 62.6 in the nonlaxity group, and these scores improved to 87.4 and 89.5, respectively, in the laxity group and to 94.1 and 94.8, respectively, in the nonlaxity group at final follow-up. The mean preoperative talar tilt angle and anterior talar translation were a respective 12.5 and 8.8 mm in the laxity group and 10.8 and 8.5 mm in the nonlaxity
group, and these values improved to 7.3 and 6.0 mm, respectively, in the laxity group and to 5.2 and 5.0 mm, respectively, in the nonlaxity group at final follow-up. Failure rates were 11.4% (5 patients) in the laxity group and 1.8% (1 patient) in the nonlaxity group. Significant differences were found between the 2 groups in terms of the Karlsson score, AOFAS score, talar tilt angle, anterior talar translation, and failure rate at final follow-up (P\.05).

Conclusion

Patients with GJL showed inferior outcomes and a higher failure rate compared with patients without GJL. Therefore, GJL appears to be a risk factor associated with recurrent instability after the modified Brostro¨m procedure.