2017 ISAKOS Biennial Congress ePoster #1011

 

Development and Validation of a Portable and Inexpensive ACL Injury Risk Identification Tool: Measuring the Drop Vertical Jump Using the Microsoft Kinect V2

Seth L. Sherman, MD, Columbia, MO UNITED STATES
Aaron Gray, MD, Columbia, MO UNITED STATES
Bradley W Willis, MPT, Columbia, MO UNITED STATES
Zhiyu Huo, MS, Columbia, MO UNITED STATES
Nathan Siesner, BS, Columbia, MO UNITED STATES
Trevor Gulbrandsen, MD, Iowa City, IA UNITED STATES
Scott M Miller, BS, Columbia, MO UNITED STATES
Swithin Razu, MS, Columbia, MO UNITED STATES
Amirhossein Jahandar, MS, Columbia, MO UNITED STATES
Marjorie Skubic, PhD, Columbia, MO UNITED STATES
Trent M Guess, PhD, Columbia, MO UNITED STATES

University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, UNITED STATES

FDA Status Not Applicable

Summary

The development of a reliable, valid, portable, markerless, inexpensive, and efficient ACL screening tool could greatly improve widespread screening techniques of young athletes.

Abstract

Background

Noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury rates in adolescent females athletes have increased significantly. Outcome measures from the drop vertical jump (DVJ) have been thought to predict such injuries. The knee ankle separation ratio (KASR), calculated at initial contact (IC) and peak flexion (PF) during the DVJ, has been proposed as a measure of dynamic knee valgus (DKV), and subsequent risk for ACL injury. The Microsoft Kinect V2 has shown promise as a reliable and valid marker-less motion capture device. The development of portable, inexpensive, and easy-to-use screening tools to capture the KASR during the DVJ could improve identification of DKV. This may improve targeted prevention programs and reduce injury rates. Alternately, the current “gold standard” Vicon motion analysis systems, used to calculate components of DKV, are time consuming, immobile and costly.

Hypothesis

The Kinect V2 will demonstrate a positive correlation between KASR results at IC and PF during the DVJ, as compared to a “gold standard” marker-based Vicon motion analysis system.

Methods

With Institutional Review Board approval, 38 healthy volunteer subjects participated in this laboratory study. Each subject performed 5 DVJ trials, simultaneously measured by an 8 camera Vicon MX-T40S system, two ATMI force platforms and a Kinect V2 with customized software. The KASR is the ratio of the distances between the knees and ankles, measured at IC and PF during the DVJ. A total of 190 jumps were completed. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess the degree of KASR agreement between the Kinect and Vicon. Standard interpretations of the ICC suggest values above 0.75 indicate good to excellent agreement.

Results

Good to excellent agreement between the Kinect and Vicon KASR measure at IC and PF existed. ICC of the Kinect V2 and Vicon KASR at IC and PF during the DVJ was 0.84 and 0.95, respectively. The customized Kinect V2 software successfully identified the KASR at PF and IC frames in 182 out of 190 trials, demonstrating a 95.8% reliability.

Conclusion

The Kinect V2 demonstrates good to excellent ICC of the KASR at IC and PF during the DVJ, as compared to the analysis by a Vicon system. A customized Kinect V2 software package demonstrates good reliability in identifying the KASR at IC and PF during the DVJ.The development of a reliable, valid, portable, markerless, inexpensive, and efficient ACL screening tool could greatly improve widespread screening techniques of young athletes. Such advances may improve targeted injury prevention programs, therefore reducing non-contact ACL injury rates.