2015 ISAKOS Biennial Congress ePoster #2001

Clinical Outcome After PCL Support Bracing Treatment for Patients with Acute Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

Sinan Said, MD, Viborg DENMARK
Martin Lind, MD, PhD, Prof., Aarhus N DENMARK
Torsten Nielsen, MS, Aarhus DENMARK
Christina Mikkelsen, PT, Stockholm SWEDEN
Bjorn Engstrom, MD, PhD, Assoc. Prof., Spanga SWEDEN

Capio Artro Clinic , Stockholm, SWEDEN

FDA Status Not Applicable

Summary: The aim of the study is to evaluate the outcome of non-operative management of acute isolated PCL injuries.

Rate:

Abstract:

Introduction

Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury occurs typically due to high energy trauma. Patients with grade 3 injuries are often treated operatively while those with grade 1 & 2 can be managed conservatively by bracing.

Aim

The aim of the study is to evaluate the outcome of non-operative management of acute isolated PCL injuries.

MATERIALS & METHODS
From March 2004 to April 2012, 36 patients with isolated acute (< 4 weeks) PCL injury were treated with PCL support brace (Jack brace). A brace with tibial supporters designed to prevent posterior displacement at the knee. 29 ptt were from Capio Arthro Clinic in Stockholm and 7 ptt from Aarhus University hospital. 23 pt were present for a median follow up of 43 months. Functional outcomes were evaluated with Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee subjective (IKDC), KOOS, Tegner, Werner scores as well as one leg hop test and anterior/posterior knee stability measured with KT-1000 arthrometer.

Results

There were 10 females and 13 males. Average age at the time of injury was 23 yrs. Mean Lysholm score was 86, median Tegner was 7, objective IKDC 2000 score showed 57% were nearly normal and 43% abnormal, KOOS scores for pain, symptoms, ADL, sport, QOL was 90,86,93,76,74 respectively. Average Werner score was 43, Average knee function (one leg hop) compared to non-injured knee was 96%. Average side-to-side difference at 70 degrees of knee flexion was 1mm.

Conclusion

PCL support bracing with attached tibial supporters designed to prevent posterior displacement at the knee yielded satisfactory clinical and functional results in the majority of the cohort study group.