2015 ISAKOS Biennial Congress ePoster #1370

Effects of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction on Neuromuscular Characteristics of the Lower Extremity in Competitive Soccer Players

Pedro Alvarez-Diaz, MD, PhD, Prof., Barcelona SPAIN
Eduard Alentorn-Geli, MD, PhD, MSc, FEBOT, FACGME, Barcelona SPAIN
Gilbert Steinbacher, MD, Sant Just Desvern SPAIN
Silvia Ramon, MD, PhD, Barcelona SPAIN
Miki Martin, FRACS, Barceloa SPAIN
Juancho Boffa, MD, Barcelona SPAIN
Roberto Seijas-Vazquez, MD, PhD, Prof., Barcelona SPAIN
Oscar Ares, PhD, Barcelona SPAIN
Ramon Cugat, MD, PhD, Barcelona SPAIN

Mutualidad de Futbolistas Espanoles. Delegacion Catalana. Fundacion Garcia Cugat. Hospital Quiron UIC, Barcelona, SPAIN

FDA Status Cleared

Summary: Background There are many studies investigating the effects of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction on neuromuscular and biomechanical characteristics. However, most of them have not been focused on mechanical and contractile changes of the skeletal muscles after surgery. There are no studies investigating these effects in soccer players through tensiomyography (TMG). Hypothesis/Purpos

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Abstract:

Background

There are many studies investigating the effects of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction on neuromuscular and biomechanical characteristics. However, most of them have not been focused on mechanical and contractile changes of the skeletal muscles after surgery. There are no studies investigating these effects in soccer players through tensiomyography (TMG).

HYPOTHESIS/PURPOSE
To investigate the effects of ACL reconstruction on mechanical and contractile characteristics of the skeletal muscles of the lower extremity in soccer players through TMG.

STUDY DESIGN
Prospective, pre-post, within-group, comparative study

Methods

All competitive male soccer players with confirmed acute ACL tear included in this study underwent resting tensiomyography assessment of muscles of both lower extremities before and one year after reconstruction. The muscles assessed were: vastus medialis (VM), vastus laterals (VL), rectus femoris (RF), semitendinosus (ST), biceps femoris (BF), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), and gastrocnemius lateralis (GL). The TMG parameters obtained for each muscle were: maximal displacement (Dm), delay time (Td), contraction time (Tc), sustained time (Ts), and half-relaxation time (Tr).

Results

The injured leg had a significant decrease in VL-Tc, ST-Tc, GM-Tc, GL-Tr and GL-Td, and a significant increase in VM-Tr and GM-Ts in the postoperative compared to preoperative period. The non-injured leg demonstrated significant pre-postoperative changes in the VL, RF and BF but not in VM, ST, GM and GL The magnitude of pre-postoperative differences in the injured leg was significantly higher in RF-Tc, ST-Tc, BF-Dm, and GL-Tr, but lower in RF-Tr, and GM-Ts, compared to the non-injured leg. Both groups improved their symmetry between the quadriceps and hamstring muscle groups in both sides.

Conclusions

The quadriceps muscles improved their resistance to fatigue and contraction velocity in both sides, and the hamstring muscles improved their contraction velocity and muscle tone in both sides as well. Improvements in contraction velocity and muscle tone were more evident in the quadriceps and hamstrings of the injured compared to the uninjured side. In addition, the intervention increased the percentage of symmetry between both sides in the TMG of the quadriceps muscles and the balance between ACL-agonist (hamstrings) and ACL-antagonist (quadriceps) muscle groups in both sides.