ISAKOS: 2019 Congress in Cancun, Mexico
ISAKOS

2019 ISAKOS Biennial Congress ePoster #1851

 

Risk Factors and Outcomes of Revision Arthroscopic Posterior Shoulder Capsulolabral Repair in Contact Athletes

Justin W. Arner, MD, Vail, CO UNITED STATES
Sachidhanand Jayakumar, BS, Pittsburgh, PA UNITED STATES
Elan J. Golan, MD, Pittsburgh, PA UNITED STATES
Dharmesh Vyas, MD, PhD, Pittsburgh, PA UNITED STATES
James P. Bradley, MD, Pittsburgh, PA UNITED STATES

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, UNITED STATES

FDA Status Cleared

Summary

Contact athletes underwent revision arthroscopic posterior capsulolabral repair at an incidence of 5.9% at 12 year follow-up with the only significant risk factor being smaller glenoid bone width.

Abstract

Purpose

Risk factors and outcomes of revision arthroscopic posterior capsulolabral repair are currently not well defined in contact athletes. Evaluation of risk factors for contact athletes who require revision arthroscopic posterior unidirectional capsulolabral repair is needed.

Methods

A total of 186 contact athletes’ shoulders that underwent arthroscopic posterior capsulolabral repair at minimum 2 year follow-up were reviewed. Those who required revision surgery were compared with those who did not. Parameters assessed included age, gender, labral and/or capsular injury, level of sport, and return to sport. Glenoid bone width, bone version, labral width, and labral version were also compared.

Results

Eleven shoulders required revision surgery (5.9%) at mean 12.0 year follow-up. The only significant risk factor was glenoid bone width (revision=26.4 mm vs. non-revision=29.1 mm, p=0.005). Cartilage version (p=0.676), labral version (p=0.539), and bone version (p=0.791) were not significantly different between groups, nor was labral width (p=0.751). Gender (p=0.326), labral injury (p=0.349), capsule injury (p=0.683), and level of sport (p=0.381) were not significant factors for requiring revision surgery. Both return to sport at the same level (revision=16.7% vs. non-revision=72.1%, p<0.001) and overall return to sport (revision=50% vs. non-revision=93.7%, p<0.001) was significantly worse in the revision group. Of those who had revision surgery, 33.3% stated their original surgery was not worthwhile, which was significantly higher than the 4.5% in the non-revision group (p=0.041).

Conclusions

Contact athletes underwent revision arthroscopic posterior capsulolabral repair at an incidence of 5.9% at 12 year follow-up. The only significant risk factor for requiring revision surgery was smaller glenoid bone width. Return to play was significantly worse in those who required revision surgery. This data is essential for patient selection, optimal treatment techniques, and patient education as posterior shoulder capsulolabral repair in contact athletes that require revision has not previously been evaluated.