ISAKOS: 2019 Congress in Cancun, Mexico
ISAKOS

2019 ISAKOS Biennial Congress ePoster #403

 

Use of a Custom Website by Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Surgical Patients: If You Build It, Will They Come?

Sean J. Meredith, MD, Baltimore, Maryland UNITED STATES
Paul E. Matuszewski, MD, Lexington, KY UNITED STATES
Michael Smuda, MSAT, Baltimore, MD UNITED STATES
Evin Taskoy, MSAT, Baltimore, MD UNITED STATES
Scott J. Koenig, MD, Baltimore, MD UNITED STATES
Vidushan Nadarajah, MD, Brooklyn, NY UNITED STATES
Jonathan D. Packer, MD, Baltimore, MD UNITED STATES
R. Frank Henn, MD, Baltimore, MD UNITED STATES

University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedics, Baltimore, MD, UNITED STATES

FDA Status Not Applicable

Summary

Orthopaedic sports medicine surgical patients used a custom informational website more than orthopaedic trauma patients, while a higher level of education and undergoing ACL reconstruction independently predicted website use.

Abstract

Introduction

Internet use for orthopaedic patient information has grown in recent years with reports ranging from 44-65% of patients researching their condition or surgeon. However, the quality of online resources is variable. Patients may benefit from a surgeon directed web site, but little is known about patients’ interest in and actual use of a designated website. In a previous study, only 11% of orthopaedic trauma patients accessed such a website. The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not sports medicine surgical patients would utilize a designated informational website if provided by their treating surgeon. We hypothesized that a higher percentage of orthopaedic sports medicine surgical patients would use the website as compared to orthopaedic trauma patients.

Methods

108 orthopaedic sports medicine patients indicated for one of eight common sports medicine procedures were enrolled in a single academic center, prospective cohort study from April 2017 to December 2017. Demographics, socioeconomic status, and previous Internet use data were collected from the study participants. Patients were provided access to the informational website utilizing a unique access code that allowed tracking of each patient’s use of the website. Data was collected including number of visits, webpages viewed, and time spent on the website. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were utilized to determine which preoperative factors predicted website use. The surgical sports medicine cohort was compared to a previously published trauma cohort using the same methodology in a similar population at the same institution.

Results

33 patients (31%) accessed the website. Orthopaedic sports medicine surgical patients were nearly 3 times more likely to use the designated website than orthopaedic trauma patients (31% vs. 11%; p=0.0004). Higher education predicted website use (p=0.006). Age, gender, race, employment status, or household income were not predictive of use (p=0.49, 0.27, 0.23, 0.15, 0.58; respectively). For knee surgery patients, ACL reconstruction was associated with website use as compared to meniscus and cartilage surgery (42% vs. 20%; p=0.037). On average, patients spent 10 minutes on the website and viewed 7.8 +/- 7.2 webpages per visit. 96% of patients who used the website found it helpful or very helpful. Prior to enrollment, 78% of patients reported using the Internet for information on their current condition, and 51% searched the Internet for information on their surgeon. Nominal logistic regression analysis confirmed higher level of education (p=0.00001) and ACL reconstruction (p=0.0005), as compared to other knee surgeries, independently predicted website use.

Conclusion

Orthopaedic sports medicine surgical patients are more likely to use a designated informational website than trauma patients; however, only 31% of patients accessed the website. The vast majority of patients who used the website found it helpful. Higher level of education is predictive of website use, as is ACL reconstruction for knee surgery patients.