ISAKOS: 2019 Congress in Cancun, Mexico
ISAKOS

2019 ISAKOS Biennial Congress ePoster #758

 

Impaired Neuromuscular Control up to Postoperative One Year in Operated and Non-Operated Knees After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

Ki-Mo Jang, MD, PhD, Prof., Seoul KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Seung-Beom Han, MD, PhD, Seoul KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Dae-Keun Suh, MD, Seoul KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Jin-Hyuck Lee, PT, Seoul KOREA, REPUBLIC OF

Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine , Seoul, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF

FDA Status Not Applicable

Summary

Neuromuscular control in both knees was not restored to preoperative levels of the non-operated knees until 1 year after ACLR. Therefore, clinicians and physical therapists should attempt to enhance neuromuscular control in both non-operated and operated knees.

Abstract

Background

Only limited data are available regarding pre- and postoperative neuromuscular control in non-athletic patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). This study was performed to assess serial changes in neuromuscular control until 1 year postoperatively in non-athletic patients undergoing ACLR.

Methods

Ninety-six patients were included. Serial neuromuscular control tests were performed preoperatively, at 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. Neuromuscular control was evaluated using acceleration time (AT) and dynamic postural stability (overall stability index, OSI). Functional activity levels were assessed using the Tegner activity-level scale.

Results

Preoperative AT of quadriceps and hamstrings in operated knees was 78.9±6.4 and 86.5±6.2 msec, respectively, which significantly reduced to 56.9±2.0 and 62.5±2.8 sec at 1 year (p=0.006 and 0.002, respectively). In non-operated knees, preoperative AT of quadriceps and hamstrings was 47.6±1.7 and 56.5±1.7 msec, respectively, which was significantly prolonged to 54.3±2.0 and 67.9±2.7 msec at 1 year (p=0.02 and 0.001, respectively). Preoperative OSI of non-operated knees was 1.2±0.0°. It significantly increased to 1.5±0.1° at 1 year (p<0.001). In operated knees, preoperative OSI was 1.8±0.1°. It significantly decreased to 1.4±0.1° at 1 year (p=0.001). Tegner scale at 6 months and 1 year were significantly lower than pre-operative scale (p<0.001). AT and OSI on both knees showed significant negative correlation with Tegner scale at 6 months and 1 year.

Conclusion

Neuromuscular control in both knees was not restored to preoperative levels of the non-operated knees until 1 year after ACLR. Therefore, clinicians and physical therapists should attempt to enhance neuromuscular control in both non-operated and operated knees.