ISAKOS: 2019 Congress in Cancun, Mexico
ISAKOS

2019 ISAKOS Biennial Congress ePoster #646

 

Rehabilitation Following Hip Arthroscopy: A Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of the Effect of Physical Therapy Characteristics on Treatment Success

Adrian Tudor, MD, Kiryat Ono ISRAEL
Michal Frankl, MD, Mevasseret Zion ISRAEL
Shai Factor, MD, Tel Aviv ISRAEL
Ran Atzmon, MD, Ashdod ISRAEL
Harrrison Volaski, Tel Aviv ISRAEL
Ehud Rath, Prof., Rehovot ISRAEL
Eyal Amar, MD, Tel Aviv ISRAEL

Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, ISRAEL

FDA Status Not Applicable

Summary

Physical therapy following hip arthroscopy does not influence mid-term PROMS or satisfaction rates significantly regardless of gender, baseline scores, program intensity, timing of initiation, or total duration.

Abstract

Despite the increasing volume of arthroscopic hip preservation surgeries, there remains a paucity of evidence to guide post-operative physical therapy (PT) protocol for hip arthroscopy treating femoracetabular impingement (FAI).

Purpose

To evaluate the effect on mid-term outcomes of various PT parameters following hip arthroscopy treating FAI.

Methods

133 patients who underwent hip arthroscopy treating FAI and labral repair with 2-year follow-up between January 2011-May 2016, were reviewed. Patients were stratified into age groups (<30, 30-50, >50 y.o.). PT protocols were assessed for: time to first session, training frequency and duration, committed self-practice and physical therapy provider. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMS) included the Modified Harris Hip Score (MHHS) and Hip Outcome Score (HOS). Rates of satisfaction were recorded by asking patients whether, considering the outcome, they would undergo the surgery again.

Results

Statistical analysis for PT variables did not differ significantly for gender (P = 0.288 – 1.000). Improvement did not differ significantly for patients that started rehabilitation later than one week (P = 0.235 – 0.9), practiced more than 3 times a week (P = 0.114 – 1.000), for more than 45 minutes (P = 0.109 – 0.969), for more than 3 months (P = 0.093 – 0.986) or committed to self-practice (P = 0.07 – 0.92). Outcome scores for patients did not differ regarding physical therapy provider (P = 0.077 – 0.991) or satisfaction rates (P = 0.200 – 1.000). Of note, time to first PT correlated closely with PT frequency (P = 0.03).

Conclusion

Physical therapy following hip arthroscopy does not influence mid-term PROMS or satisfaction rates significantly regardless of gender, baseline scores, program intensity, timing of initiation, or total duration. Further research is required to assess physical therapy protocol following hip arthroscopy treating FAI.