ISAKOS: 2019 Congress in Cancun, Mexico
ISAKOS

2019 ISAKOS Biennial Congress ePoster #645

 

Validating Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Hip Arthroscopy

Ryan S. Selley, MD, Chicago, IL UNITED STATES
Vehniah K. Tjong, MD, FRCSC, Chicago, IL UNITED STATES
Richard W. Nicolay, MD, Chicago, IL UNITED STATES
Michael Terry, MD, Chicago, IL UNITED STATES
Vehniah K. Tjong, MD, FRCSC, Chicago, IL UNITED STATES

Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES

FDA Status Not Applicable

Summary

The purpose of this study was to validate PROMIS CAT against traditional legacy measures in patients undergoing hip arthroscopy for femoral acetabular impingement (FAI).

Abstract

Objectives:
The value of health care delivery and assessment has recently undergone a paradigm shift in the United States with increasing focus on Patient-Reported Outcomes (PROs). Within the field of orthopedics providers and policy makers are interested in the value of surgical intervention. The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System - Computer Adaptive Testing (PROMIS CAT) was developed to provide measures of patient-reported symptoms and healthcare outcomes across a variety of conditions in an easily accessible manner. In order to validate PROMIS in hip arthroscopy it must be correlated with known legacy measures. The hip outcome score (HOS), Non-Arthritic Hip Score (NAHS) and modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) have served as traditional legacy measures in this population. The purpose of this study was to validate PROMIS CAT against traditional legacy measures in patients undergoing hip arthroscopy for femoral acetabular impingement (FAI).

Methods

Patients undergoing elective hip arthroscopy for FAI at a single academic institution from April 2017 to April 2018 by two fellowship trained surgeons were enrolled in the study. Patients under the age of 18, revision cases and those for diagnosis other than FAI were excluded. Eligible patients completed multiple outcomes questionnaires prior to surgery and at 2 and 6 weeks post-operatively. Outcome measures included PROMIS CAT pain and physical function, mHHS, HOS (Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Sport Subscales), NAHS, and Visual Analog Pain Scale (VAS). Pearson’s correlation coefficients were calculated between each outcome measure.

Results

A total of 81 patients elected to be included in the study at an average age of 39.6+/-12.6 years, 54 (66.6%) were female and 27 (33.3%) were male. All 81 patients completed the pre-surgical outcome measures, 50 completed the 2 week post-operative measures and 46 completed the 6 week post-operative questionnaires. Strong correlations were observed between the PROMIS CAT Physical Function T-Score and the mHHS (r=0.64-0.81), HOS- ADL (r=0.75-0.82), HOS-Sport (r=0.57-0.72) and NAHS (r=0.55-0.75) measurement tools. PROMIS CAT Pain T Score and VAS also demonstrated a strong correlation (r=0.66-0.77).

Conclusion

PROMIS Physical Function Scores correlate strongly with mHHS, HOS-ADL, HOS-Sport and NAHS scores at all time points. Likewise, PROMIS Pain Scores correlate strongly with VAS pain scores. These results indicate that PROMIS scores can be utilized as a valid physical function and pain assessment tools for patients with FAI undergoing hip arthroscopy.