ISAKOS: 2019 Congress in Cancun, Mexico
ISAKOS

2019 ISAKOS Biennial Congress ePoster #607

 

What Makes Suture Anchor Use Safe in Hip Arthroscopy?: A Systematic Review of Techniques and Safety Profile

Ajay Shah, MD Cand., Hamilton, ON CANADA
Jeffrey Kay, MD, Toronto, ON CANADA
Muzammil Memon, MD, Hamilton, ON CANADA
Ryan Coughlin, MD, Beaconsfield, QC CANADA
Nicole Simunovic, MSc, Hamilton, ON CANADA
Shane Nho, MD, Chicago, IL UNITED STATES
Olufemi R. Ayeni, MD, PhD, MSc, FRCSC, Hamilton, ON CANADA

McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, CANADA

FDA Status Not Applicable

Summary

The current literature suggests that suture anchors at anterior acetabular rim positions (3-4 o’clock) should be inserted with caution to reduce the likelihood of complications, and large-diameter (>2.3-mm) suture anchors increase the likelihood of articular perforation without increasing labral stability.

Abstract

Purpose

To assess the current literature on suture anchor placement for the purpose of identifying factors that lead to suture anchor perforation and techniques that reduce the likelihood of complications.

Methods

Three databases (PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE) were searched on March 23, 2018 from database inception, and two reviewers independently screened the resulting literature. Methodological quality of all included papers was assessed using Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies criteria and the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment tool. Results are presented in a narrative summary fashion using descriptive statistics.

Results

14 studies were included in this review. Four case series (491 patients, 56.6% female, mean age 33.9 years), nine controlled cadaveric/laboratory studies (111 cadaveric hips and 12 sawbones, 42.2% female, mean age 60.0 years), and one randomized controlled trial (37 hips, 55.6% female, mean age 34.2 years) were included. Anterior cortical perforation by suture anchors led to pain and impingement of pelvic neurovascular structures. The anterior acetabular positions (3-4 o’clock) had the thinnest bone, smallest rim angles, and highest incidence of articular perforation. Drilling angles from 10? to 20? measured off the coronal plane were acceptable. The mid-anterior (MA) and distal anterolateral (DALA) portals were used successfully, with some studies reporting difficulty placing anchors at anterior locations via the DALA portal. Small-diameter (<1.8-mm) suture anchors had a lower in vivo incidence of articular perforation with similar stability and pull-out strength in biomechanical studies.

Conclusions

Suture anchors at anterior acetabular rim positions (3-4 o’clock) should be inserted with caution. Large-diameter (>2.3-mm) suture anchors increase the likelihood of articular perforation without increasing labral stability. Inserting small-diameter (<1.8-mm) all-suture suture anchors (ASAs) from 10° to 20° using curved suture anchor drill guides, may increase safe insertion angles from all cutaneous portals. Direct arthroscopic visualization, use of fluoroscopy, distal-proximal insertion, and the use of nitinol wire can help prevent articular violation.